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Understanding COVID Variants

May 10, 2022
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Clinical Terminology: What Are Phases In Clinical Research With the Omicron variant gaining more attention worldwide, this is the perfect time to educate anyone who is uncertain about what a COVID Variant is.

Clinical Terminology: What Are Phases In Clinical Research

With the Omicron variant gaining more attention worldwide, this is the perfect time to educate anyone who is uncertain about what a COVID Variant is. In this posting, we will go over how they work, what they are, and if we can expect more variants to surface.

New variations of COVID-19 continue to arise, which worries and scares people. From the delta variant to the latest omicron variant, people may wonder how these variants function and impact us.

We want you to understand variants, how they work, and what you should do to prevent yourself from catching them. We will discuss the omicron variant along with some details on other COVID variants. As we do so, we will refer to the information shared by the CDC.

What Are COVID Variants?

COVID-19 variants refer to strains formed from the virus. A variant usually causes the same side effects as the original, but it may be more potent in its severity.

The delta and omicron variants stand out as the most common ones. Each variant differs from the original by being more contagious than the original strand and causing more substantial side effects.

What Are COVID Variants

How Do They Work?

COVID-19 variants develop with time as people get infected. When COVID infects people, it can mutate within the host’s body. These mutations develop into variants, causing its characteristics and the symptoms they produce to change:

  • It can be more contagious
  • It can increase the severity of the symptoms
  • People can catch COVID multiple times

In short, COVID variants make the virus more dangerous. This means paying attention to news about the variants and learning about them when possible will be beneficial. The way they vary depends on the variant itself, so research is needed to better understand the differences.

How Do They Work

Will More Variants Surface?

This depends on how the virus develops and spreads. If the virus continues to spread to more people, it increases the odds of the virus mutating and evolving more variants. For example, the flu returns yearly since it mutates rapidly enough for new variants to emerge.

The longer COVID–19 can infect people, the more variants will develop. This means people can fight against the development of these variants by getting the vaccine and avoiding infection.

In short, variants can surface, but the risk of this happening lowers as people do their best to prevent the spreading.

What You Can Do

First, you should do what you can to prevent the disease from spreading. This means you should social distance and wear a face mask while outside. The vaccine will also help you not catch COVID, so it doesn’t have the chance to mutate in the body.

If you don’t want to get the vaccine, you should wash your hands and do what you can to keep yourself safe from the virus. While you won’t have as much protection as those with the vaccine, you should avoid spreading and catching it when possible. There are also new medications and treatments other than the vaccine being tested for their ability to lower your chance of infection.

Final Remarks

When it comes to COVID variants, we need to do our best to stop them from spreading by listening to the CDC guidelines. If everyone can put in the effort and do their research, we can overcome the disease and stop the spread so that people can be safe.

If you have questions about COVID, the omicron variant, or need treatment for an existing covid infection, you can contact us for help and answers.

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At Ascada Health and Ascada Research, we are dedicated to the advancement of the medical sciences.
Ascada Health:
Phone: (657) 230-7337
Fax: (657) 272-7720
Email: info@ascadahealth.org
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Email: info@ascadaresearch.org