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What Are Monoclonal Antibodies?

Jan 05, 2022
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If you’ve been watching the news about the Covid 19 pandemic, chances are, you’ve seen a lot of stories about monoclonal antibodies. Many people have had great results from being treated with monoclonal antibodies,...

If you’ve been watching the news about the Covid 19 pandemic, chances are, you’ve seen a lot of stories about monoclonal antibodies.

Many people have had great results from being treated with monoclonal antibodies, and some people have been choosing them over vaccination.

However, just as many people don’t know exactly what monoclonal antibodies are, how they work, or how they help people with Covid and other serious illnesses. So, let’s take a closer look.

When Were Monoclonal Antibodies First Created?

With all the hype about monoclonal antibodies as a Covid treatment, you might think they’re something new. But the truth is, like mRNA research, they’ve been in development for a very long time.

In the case of monoclonal antibodies, the first FDA approved treatment that used it was in 1986. Since then, they have been used for many different diseases.

So, What Are Monoclonal Antibodies?

You might have thought that monoclonal antibodies are a treatment or technology that was created specifically for Covid treatment. However, like the vaccines that we are using to prevent infections, they’ve been around for a long time, and we’ve simply been adapting the technologies to this new threat.

Monoclonal antibodies are antibodies that are created in a lab, rather than in our bodies. Like the antibodies we produce, they are created by “teaching” white blood cells how to fight specific diseases, by introducing them to the unique proteins that make up those diseases.

Like other viruses, Covid 19 virus cells have a unique protein structure on the surface of each particle. This protein structure lets them attack and infiltrate human cells – what we call infection.

When we create monoclonal antibodies in a lab, we introduce those proteins to white blood cells in a lab. When those white blood cells develop the ability to fight the new protein structure, they’re cloned, and then those manufactured antibodies are injected into a patient.

Essentially, the same process that takes place in our bodies after we are vaccinated happens before the treatment is administered, but the result is the same. Our bodies “learn” how to fight novel viruses like Covid.

Other Diseases That Use Monoclonal Antibodies

Ascada Health and other monoclonal antibody producers have got a lot of attention since Covid came along, but this is far from the first time we’ve used this technology.

Monoclonal antibody treatments have been used extensively in treating certain types of cancer. They’re also used for autoimmune diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis, lupus, and MS. Some people with Crohn’s disease, psoriasis and some kinds of cardiovascular disease might also be treated with some kind of monoclonal antibody.

The Future of Medicine

There are very few good things that we can say have come out of the Covid 19 pandemic. However, the advances in medicine we have made over the past two years are certainly one of them.

Widespread use of treatments like monoclonal antibodies and mRNA treatments, and work by companies like Ascada research will have far reaching effects. We’re learning so much more about how to fight diseases that might once have been fatal, and it’s all thanks to cutting edge treatments like these. So, you could say that monoclonal antibodies might just be our next medical miracle.

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At Ascada Health and Ascada Research, we are dedicated to the advancement of the medical sciences.
Ascada Health:
Phone: (657) 230-7337
Fax: (657) 272-7720
Email: info@ascadahealth.org
Ascada Research:
Phone Fullerton: (657) 214-3679
Phone Huntington Beach: (657) 214-3688
Email: info@ascadaresearch.org